Fauna

Native bats (long tail, pekpeka) are very rare but we are lucky to have them present. They are difficult to see but at dusk, along the river, look for their erratic flight pattern. Swallows which are more direct flyers are also catching prey on the wing. Native falcon and Bush robins are classed as localized and are occasionally seen. Weka once more common have not made friends with all of the locals so they are not often seen. In abundance are Kereru (wood pigeon), tui and bellbird (korimako), fantail. The melodic singing of the Grey Warbler is often heard as well as the distinct call of the Shinning Cuckoo – this bird lays its eggs in the nest of the much smaller Warblers after tossing out their eggs or nestlings , an interesting adaptation. The cuckoo winters over in warmer climes arriving in spring and signally to maori tradition to start work in the garden. Morepork (native owl) are occasionally heard at night along with a chorus of frogs. Exotic birds are also seen and heard redpolls, yellowheads, magpie etc, etc. Glow worms are found along banks and cliffs, particularly where it is still and moist. They glow to attract mates and to attract food to their sticky web lines that trail from webbed home.

Green efforts

We are currently planting a small stream that runs behind cabins 2,3 & 4. Wind blown trees have be removed along with initial weed control. We have marked the existing native seedlings with white tipped bamboo canes to reduce the risk of them being killed in future weed control activities. A small pool has been built and we’ll relocate one of our native eels here. Fresh water crayfish (koura) can be found along this stream which forms the glow worm grotto and discharges into the Wakamarina River as you access it from the camp track. On going rat & possum trapping continues. Stoats & wild cats are still present, deer, pigs and goats can been heard and occasionally seen and provide recreational hunting.2

Native fuchsia tree, Fuchsia exorticata, kotukutuku

Advertisements